click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 17
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a representative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the cor
: connecticut independent senator joe leiberman observed on cnn that passing new gun laws won't be easy. >> the strength of the nra that more than half of the abuts in america have guns, own guns, have them in their homes. >> brown: they already may be having affect, gun store owners around the country have reported their stock is flying off the shelves. >> we have christmas business, hunting season business now we have the political business. >> brown: back in newtown the focus remained on coping with a christmas ravaged by grief. local post office received a flood of cards with messages of hope and towns people expect to light hundreds of outdoor candles tonight for the 26 shooting victims. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, egypt's troubled referendum; medical marijuana runs into federal law; special elections coming to the senate; helping haiti's orphans; and hundred years of "poetry" magazine. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the christmas of 2012 began arriving around the world this evening. in bethlehem, manger square was adorned
.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to liv
, sometimes at a hospital, some of the barriers to doing that in terms of official law and regulation have been substantial. so there are many families who lament the fact they've got a youngster who is troubling, dangerous, large, could hurt and their ability to influence that is limited. you've got to wait until somebody does something or definitive that they're going to do something to hospitalize them rather than take inaction. >> since we're talking approximate that and it's an issue in everybody's mind, what don't we know about the link between mental illness and violence that we should know? >> i think, firstly, we should know is that for the most part, mentally ill patients are not violent. more often they're victims of violence than perpetrators. you'll get a certain number who will, that's clear. but mental illness is a disease which often causes people to be timid, suspicious, isolated, afraid of other people, not necessarily coming at them in an aggressive way. having said that, you'll get the occasional instance where somebody will do something horrendous like we've seen here
. then, enforce the laws. yes, i know. determined killers will always find a way, but we can minimize the opportunities and scale back the scope of destruction. why do we accept the need for driver's licenses or submit to the sometimes humiliating body scans at airports? because it's the law, and deep down we know we're safer for the inconvenience of the law. good laws are hard to come by. civilization, just as hard. the rough and tumble of politics makes them so. but democracy aims for a moral order as just as humanly possible, which means laws that protect the weak and not just the strong. lest we forget. >>> we've seen throughout our history what happens when politics doesn't work, when democracy breaks down. the greatest, most heartbreaking problem was the failure toll solve slavery, a failure that l led to civil war. even then, it took a last act of political courage and prowess to permanently abolish slavery with the 13th amendment to the constitution. this is the story told in the beautiful motion picture "lincoln" starring daniel day lewis and sally field. the film presents th
laws. underscoring that plea, a gunman killed three people today west of harrisburg, pennsylvania. he was killed later in a shootout with state troopers. since the attack, the nra has been the subject of heavy criticism, but its leaders had refused to do any interviews before this weekend, including the newshour. the group broke its near silence in washington, d.c., this morning. vice president wayne lapierre would not answer any questions, but he read a nearly 25-minute- long statement that called for armed guards in every school. here are excerpts of what he said. he was interrupted twice by protesters. >> the national rifle association's four million mothers, fathers, sons and daughters join the nation in horror, outrage, grief and earnest prayer for the families of newtown, connecticut, who have suffered such incomprehensible loss as a result of this unspeakable crime. for all the noise and anger directed at us over the past week, no one-- nobody-- has addressed the most important, pressing and immediate question we face: how do we protect our children right now, starting today, i
's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits. >> ( translated ): we are taking out this peaceful protest. we don't have any conflict with the police. we have just come here to express our stand. all the students are expressing their opinions here as you can see so the police should allow all of us to pass through to the place. this is only our demand and nothing else. >> holman: the rape that ignited the protests was that of a 23- year-old woman attacked by six men, then thrown from a moving bus. overnight, she arrived in singapore via air ambulance for treatment of severe internal injuries. doctors described her condition as extremely critical. the top prosecutor in egypt has ordered an investigation of major opposition leaders for allegedly inciting revolt. an official in the prosecutor's office said today the probe will focus on nobel peace laureate mohammed el-baradei, f
and the children's health insurance program, or chip, which under current law are exempt from the sequester, could be one area where lawmakers look to make cuts. in 2010, more than 40%-- or about $278 billion states received in overall funding-- went to these two programs. >> looking at past proposals, there is a good chance that something like medicaid would be cut, and that would obviously have direct impact on state budgets. but what it would entail is still unknown. >> reporter: also on the table for lawmakers to consider: municipal bonds. they've traditionally been tax- exempt. if that changes, they could become less attractive as an investment vehicle, and end up raising borrowing costs for states and municipalities. >> it would effectively increase the cost of issuing debt to state and local governments, and it's a real consideration at a time when states and local governments are still in repair mode. >> reporter: while some states have built up rainy day funds, credit rating analysts at s&p say for the first time since the start of the financial crisis, the health of the overall u.s. econ
the nation's commerce. >> reporter: the sticking point in negotiations: a decades old law, called the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and t
corruption scandals. russian president vladimir putin signed a bill into law today banning americans from adopting russian children. the move terminated more than 50 adoptions that already were underway. the measure came in reaction to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russians accused of human rights abuses. former president george h.w. bush was said to be alert and improving today. a family spokesman said he's even singing with doctors and nurses. mr. bush is 88 years old. he's been hospitalized in houston with complications from bronchitis. this week, he was placed in intensive care, but in an e-mail yesterday, his chief of staff said the former president wants people to put the harps back in the closet. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: the victim of a horrific gang rape in india died tonight at a hospital in singapore. the attack enraged much of the country, and the reaction caught the government off-guard. ray suarez has more. >> suarez: the fury across india has been building for nearly two weeks, since a 23-year-old medical student was gang-
tradition. jesus goes up onto a mountain to teach and there talks about the law. he looks like moses. >> ( dramatized ): when jesus saw the crowds, he went up to the mountain and began to speak and taught them, saying, "you are the light of the world." >> jesus delivers five different sermons of this sort, just like the five books of torah. >> think not that i have come to abolish the law and the prophets. i have come not to abolish, but to fulfill. >> in "matthew," jesus is a proponent of torah piety, just like the pharisees. >> ( dramatized ): whoever breaks one of these commandments will be called least in the kingdom of heaven. for i tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and the pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. >> narrator: the jesus of "matthew" singles out the pharisees for a bitter attack. >> ( dramatized ): woe to you scribes and pharisees, hypocrites. for you are like whitewashed tombs which on the outside look beautiful, but inside, they are full of the bones of the dead and all kinds of filth. >> now, in jesus' own times, the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)